“It is extremely important for emerging curators to gain visibility for their work in an 
international context, and to create a career within an international network.” – Nicolaus Schafhausen

Fogo's Island Inn

TWO YOUNG CANADIAN CURATORS SELECTED FOR INAUGURAL RESIDENCIES AT FOGO ISLAND ARTS

OTTAWA / FOGO ISLAND, 23 September 2014 – Emerging curators Kari Cwynar of Toronto and Darryn Doull of Sarnia, Ontario are the recipients of the inaugural Hnatyshyn Foundation – Fogo Island Arts Young Curator Residency. The curatorial residency, valued at $15,000 is the first of its kind in Canada and will see a young curator between the ages of 25 and 30 selected to conduct a one-month residency each year.

The new program provides an opportunity for young Canadian curators to work in residence at Fogo Island Arts, a contemporary art venue on Fogo Island, Newfoundland. During the residency, the curators will work closely with Fogo Island Arts staff, international artists-in-residence and members of the community, and contribute to exhibitions and publications curated by Fogo Island Arts. The residencies will take place in the fall of 2014 and the winter of 2015. A third residency will be awarded in 2016. The residency program targets young curators who have the determination and talent to contribute to the legacy of art in Canada. Candidates are selected based on their body of work and their ability to work both independently and as part of a team. The selections were adjudicated by Nicolaus Schafhausen, Curator and Special Advisor to Fogo Island Arts and the Shorefast Foundation, and Director of Kunsthalle Wien, and Reesa Greenberg, a historian and museum consultant based in Ottawa.

“It is extremely important for emerging curators to gain visibility for their work in an international context, and to create a career within an international network. Fogo Island Arts and the initiatives of the Shorefast Foundation are the perfect venues for developing the careers of young curators. We very much look forward to working with Kary Cwynar and Darryn Doull.”
– Nicolaus Schafhausen

Kari Cwynar is from Vancouver and works in Toronto. She is Director at Kunstverein Toronto, and has held positions as a curatorial researcher at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Banff Centre. She also works as an international correspondent for Metropolis M magazine, Utrecht.  Kari holds an MA in art history from Carleton University and a BA in art history from Queens University. She has also studied at Independent Curators International in New York, and in the de Appel curatorial programme in Amsterdam.

Darryn Doull is a curator, musician, artist, and gardener currently based in Sarnia, Ontario. He was part of the curatorial team that managed the transformation of the Judith & Norman Alix Art Gallery, moving to a historically significant purpose-built facility in 2012. Recent curatorial credits of contemporary and historical art exhibitions include: James Kirkpatrick: Sculpting Sound (2013); Making Methods: Mark Stebbins, Samantha Mogelonsky, Becky Ip (2013-14, with Linda Jansma); It Isn’t Either Or: The 70s in Ontario (2013); and Ron Martin: Activating Absence (2014). Writings have been included in the monograph Adad Hannah: The Diversions(2012), in exhibition materials for Andreas Rutkauskas: Petrolia (2013), and numerous other exhibition publications. Darryn graduated with distinction from the Studio Art program at the University of Guelph in 2010.

About Fogo Island Arts
Established in 2008, Fogo Island Arts is a residency-based contemporary art venue providing support for artistic exploration and production for artists, filmmakers, writers, musicians, curators, designers, and thinkers from around the world. For more information, visit the website at www.fogoislandarts.ca

About The Hnatyshyn Foundation
The Hnatyshyn Foundation is a private charity established by the late Right Honourable Ramon John Hnatyshyn, Canada’s twenty-fourth Governor General, to assist emerging and established artists in all disciplines with their schooling and development, and promote to the Canadian public the importance of the arts in our society. Its programs are funded by donations from government, foundations, corporations and individuals. The Department of Canadian Heritage has provided $5 million in grants to the Foundation.